Punk music was incepted to break away from society’s constraints and limitations, working outside of authorities to deliver to the underdog.

That original ethos may be a little far removed from Discogs latest sale – the crowdsourced database of rare music memorabilia has just verified the sale of a 1977 Sex Pistols seven-inch for $14,690, topping the list of the 30 most expensive records sold on the record-collecting database and marketplace for November.

The seven-inch features the band’s iconic track, “God Save The Queen” and has been listed by The Guardian as one of the rarest records in Britain. Like all punk tales, the band’s label A&M was said to have pressed around 25,000 copies of the seven-inch in ’77, just before label founder  Herb Alpert reportedly destroyed the Sex Pistols’ recording contract just six days after signing them, ultimately imploding the band.

Although 25,000 copies were pressed, only nine copies of the unreleased recording are thought to exist with previous auctions for the record reaching £13,000. Genuine copies feature a “serrated anti-slip necklace” and 7284 written twice on the B-Side runout, one above the other. Search your cool Uncle’s garage, he could be hoarding a goldmine.